anti-Semitic attack anti-Semitism Europe SWC

SWC’S RABBI COOPER ON THE 75TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE KRISTALLNACHT: STILL CASTING ITS LONG SHADOW ON EUROPE……..

 

Think of the duplicitous, disingenuous behavior of Europe’s leaders over the past 5 decades. Soon after the murdering 6 million Jews on the European continent, and the subsequent displacement of hundreds of thousands of other Jews to safer shores, the ‘leaders’ of Europe import millions of Jew hating Muslims to take their place.

Call me cynical if you’d like, but something tells me that Europe really does have in fact a problem with anti-Jewish impulses. The kicker is, their latest gambit, in the name of multiculturalism, is going to bite them long and hared in their faux humanitarian asses, and lead to its eventual societal disembowelment.

NOTE: Take it for what it’s worth, it’s just my opinion, but an educated one, based on empirical evidence over the past ten years.

Is European hatred of Jews a thing of the past?
In his latest book, “Demonizing Israel and the Jews,” Manfred Gerstenfeld, analyzes polls taken across the continent and estimates that at least 150 million Europeans still harbor extreme anti-Jewish and/or anti-Israel animus.
Do Europe’s Jews feel safe?
According to Gerstenfeld, 25 percent are afraid to wear kippot or Star of David jewelry in public. While today armed police stand on guard across Europe protecting synagogues, 80 synagogues have been attacked in recent years in Germany alone. Jewish children have been targeted for bullying in Scandinavia and for insult, injury, even death on the campuses of day schools and Yeshivot in France.

Kristallnacht still casts a long shadow on Europe

  • BY ABRAHAM COOPER
A sculpture of a woman and a child is silhouetted against the water of Schwedsee lake at Nazi death camp Ravensbrueck about 100 kilometers (62 miles) north of Berlin, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. On Nov. 9, 2013 Germany remembers the 75th anniversary of the 'Kristallnacht', 'Night Of The Broken Glasses' or 'November Pogrom'. On Nov. 9, 1939  the Nazis coordinated a wave of attacks in Germany and Austria, smashing windows, burning synagogues, ransacking homes and looting Jewish-owned stores. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

A sculpture of a woman and a child is silhouetted against the water of Schwedsee lake at Nazi death camp Ravensbrueck about 100 kilometers (62 miles) north of Berlin, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. On Nov. 9, 2013 Germany remembers the 75th anniversary of the ‘Kristallnacht’, ‘Night Of The Broken Glasses’ or ‘November Pogrom’. On Nov. 9, 1939 the Nazis coordinated a wave of attacks in Germany and Austria, smashing windows, burning synagogues, ransacking homes and looting Jewish-owned stores. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

Kristallnacht. Seventy-five years later, the very word (Night of Broken Glass) still casts its long shadow. On Nov. 9th, 1938, a mass pogrom was unleashed by the German High command against the Jews of Germany and Austria. It marked the Nazi regime’s transition from the quasi-legal discriminatory Nuremberg Laws to coming of ‘Final Solution’ genocide against European Jewry.

The official statistics— 91 Jews were killed, thousands more put into concentration camps, 267 synagogues burned, and 7,500 Jewish businesses vandalized, fail to describe the overwhelming sense of terror and foreboding which enveloped German Jewry. They had just experienced the overwhelming indifference and antipathy of neighbors, when police and fire departments were deployed not to douse the flames engulfing historic houses of worship or stop vicious beatings, but only to protect the property of proper Aryans.

In his diary, Reich Minister Goebbels celebrated: “As I am driven to the hotel [in Munich], windowpanes shatter. Bravo! Bravo! The synagogues burn like big old cabins.”

He and Hitler had reason to celebrate. The world didn’t give a damn about the Jews and soon the path from burning synagogues would lead to the plumes of ashes of mass murdered Jews spewing forth from death camp crematoria, covered by the fog of war and buried by an indifferent humanity.

Their celebrations continued as other conflagrations enveloped all of Europe. Cities from London to Warsaw to Leningrad were devastated by the Nazi Blitzkrieg. But by May 1945, when WWII ended, the very same streets in Munich and Berlin whose synagogues were torched and whose Jews were disappeared, were themselves reduced to rubble by the onslaught of Allied firebombs.

More here.

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