Islam in action Islam in Finland MUSLIM SETTLERS

250 000 FINNS UNEMPLOYED AS MINISTRY OF EMPLOYMENT PLANS TO EMPLOY 10 000 ASYLUM SEEKERS AROUND COUNTRY…..

Don’t worry, they’ll learn Finnish on the job!

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This is all about shifting these muslim settlers to other parts of Finland, in a share-the-burden scheme. That’s right, Finns are going to be even further imposed upon by big government, but don’t complain, this is to be expected within a top-down statist run welfare state. So don’t act surprised.

The traditional integration model in Finland has first provided immigrants with extensive language training and only then required them to start a job search. Results have been disappointing, as many newcomers are unable to find work due to strict language proficiency requirements, even though they have attended the entire course of language classes. Oivo says the new approach will instead favour learning Finnish on the job.

All the elements for an epic failure result. The more Islam you have in your country, the less better off you are.

Ministry plans transfer of asylum recipients to regions with labour shortages

Plans are underway to transfer the over 10,000 people expected to be granted asylum in Finland soon to those parts of the country in need of workers. The Ministry of Employment and the Economy is confident that the new resident permit holders will learn Finnish on the job.

Jari Lindström
Jari Lindström led a press conference in Helsinki on the topics of immigrant integration and municipal governance on Wednesday. Image: Jussi Nukari / Lehtikuva

Decisions are expected in the coming weeks about which of Finland’s 32,000 asylum seekers that arrived in the country last year will be granted asylum. Estimates say that one third of the applicants, or just over 10,000, are expected to be awarded residence permits.

Minister of Justice and Employment Jari Lindström said on Wednesday in a press conference on the subject that the best way to integrate asylum seekers is to get them a job.

Director General of the Employment and Economy Ministry Tuija Oivo outlined three ways the ministry plans to encourage employment among the new residents: subsidised employment, work trials and education.

She says an essential matter that still has to be addressed is how the asylum recipients will be placed throughout the country.

“We will try to fulfil two goals simultaneously: to find people work and direct them to areas where more work is on offer, as there are some places that even have labour shortages,” she says.

Many municipalities reluctant

It is not an easy situation, however, because the local government ELY offices are already in their second round of negotiations with the municipalities about how the placement will be coordinated.

According to the current proposal on the table, central government will compensate local authorities for the integration costs associated with the initial stages of integration with additional funding from the 2016 budget.

“Local decision-makers are of the opinion that the government has to guarantee language instruction, for example,” Oivo explains.

She says that everyone involved needs to start making things happen: municipalities have to agree on compensation levels and living arrangements. A model for subletting residential units has already been proposed.

The traditional integration model in Finland has first provided immigrants with extensive language training and only then required them to start a job search. Results have been disappointing, as many newcomers are unable to find work due to strict language proficiency requirements, even though they have attended the entire course of language classes. Oivo says the new approach will instead favour learning Finnish on the job.

“Representatives of the construction, health care and service industries have boldly declared their willingness to be a part of this new approach,” she said.

“The construction industry is a great example. They want in because they are thinking about where their future workforce is going to come from,” adds Minister Lindström.

Orpo’s misstep

Minister of the Interior Petteri Orpo suggested in January that immigrants could be hired at a lower wage at first to guarantee they secure work.  He said it would be an integration tool, because the most important objective is to find work for the new residents.

After Finland’s unions came down hard on him, arguing equal pay for equal work, the centre-right National Coalition Party member Orpo later formulated that he had a form of apprenticeship training in mind.

Finland’s largest union confederations were not consoled, however, and two of the largest, SAK and STTK, have both expressed their concerns that a new lower caste of employee is being created to provide a parallel low-cost labour market.

Lindström admits mixed message

One of the goals of the government’s programme on asylum policy is to reduce some of the so-called pull factors that draw immigrants to Finland. The security status of the applicants’ native countries will be assessed twice yearly in the future as part of this effort, for example.

“I understand the potential conflict, but we have to reduce the pull factors,” the anti-immigrant Finns Party member Minister Lindström says.

He had the same reply when asked about Finland’s plans to impose stricter family reunification rules.

“I understand there is a conflict, but we must consider how much we can afford to do. I know the potential problems that changes to family reunification policy would contain,” he said on Wednesday.

“No more uncontrolled immigration”

Prime Minister Juha Sipilä’s conservative coalition government has announced plans to make it increasingly difficult for asylum seeker family reunification in Finland. Minister Lindström defended the policy at Wednesday’s press conference:

“We have no wish for more uncontrolled immigration.”

As to the integration process reform in general, Lindström said every effort is being made to make the process more conducive to working life.

“It’s clear it won’t be easy. We are making reforms to our integration policies and principles on a tight schedule. All of the measures adapted must also be cost-effective, with no room for shortcuts.”

Yle

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