Finnish Immigration Concerns MUSLIM SETTLERS Stefan

FINLAND: SOCIAL WORKERS IN ASYLUM CENTER COACHING “REFUGEES” TO GET THEIR STORIES STRAIGHT…….

The Tundra Tabloids’ correspondent, Stefan, who works in the Finnish immigrant/asylum seeker/refugee cottage industry has a new report.

This happened last week at a reception center in a town east of Helsinki, where Muslim men are supposedly seeking asylum or refugee status. The names and places have been redacted to provide a modicum of anonymity.

By the way, in the end, the aunties summoned both men to their office and gave a helpful tip to them:

“Before your big interview with the authorities sit down with your brother and sisters and review your stories, coordinate everything, and make sure that you say the same story in the final interview, OK?”

Asylum seekers arrive at a refugee reception centre in the northern town of Tornio, Finland September 25, 2015. REUTERS/Panu Pohjola/Lehtikuva
Asylum seekers arrive at a refugee reception centre in the northern town of Tornio, Finland September 25, 2015. REUTERS/Panu Pohjola/Lehtikuva

I had an interesting day. I went to a place called [redacted] in [redacted], for the first time. Of course as far as I could see most of them looked to me like young male adults. I worked a case for two [redacted] brothers. One told a bunch of tear-jerking stories about how badly the Iranians treat Afghans  and how mean we are for asking them money in order to let them study in our taxpayer funded schools.

Of course he was very clever or had good advice from somebody, so he concocted a really creative story to connect himself to the war in Syria. He said that for the last few years the school authorities were forcing the students to volunteer for the war in Syria on the side of Assad! I know that Iran has some boots on the ground in Syria, but they are usually the high ranking Pasdaran (The Revolutionary Guards) Corps.

So it was obvious to me that he was speaking BS! He also painted a horrible picture of Iranians as racist xenophobes who just, left and right, randomly beat Afghans! The fact is that if you are a religious minority the vigilantes harass and beat you up sometimes. But I have never seen Afghans being harassed like that!

I lived in [redacted] where a LOT of Afghans live and I can say that they are more or less treated like Mexican illegals in the US, and given minimal jobs for lower wages exactly like the Mexicans, except that they don’t get free schooling and free medical care, since most Iranians don’t get much free medical care either and in some areas access to schools are scares even for the natives.

The authorities usually tolerate the illegal Afghans because of their role in doing the minimal jobs, but sometimes they decide to get tough and deport some of them, after which they quickly would turn around and come back to Iran again. We also don’t have birthright citizenship which means we don’t give IDs to their children born in Iran, but they refuse to get IDs for their kids from Afghanistan either so they go around without IDs often. They are very highly represented in crime, especially drug crimes and rape.

But when this guy left and his brother, who was a much more honest guy, came for the interview, he was asked if he was also working, he said that neither he nor any of his siblings were working and only their widowed mother was working as a housekeeper for a while.

Then they asked him about Syrian war recruitment and he said that he never heard of it. He also said that in recent years one of his sisters had married a doctor and his mother didn’t have to work anymore either since the good doctor was taking care of them.

When these discrepancies started to show the two do-gooding social workers who wanted to help these men to stay at all costs, started to quite obviously help and nudge him to give answers similar to his brother! They started to frame the questions in a rhetorical way like:

-“And you lived in one room in Tehran, right?”,

-“And your mother was working for a rich family as housekeeper for seven years, right?” and they kept framing the questions in a way that the desired answer was apparent in the question and the man just had to say “yes, yes!”

These social-worker aunties were supposed to write a recommendation to maahanmuuttovirasto (immigration board) after this interview and as they put it: “explain to the authorities why we really think you should be allowed to stay in Finland.”

By the way, when were asked when, why and how they decided to come here the older man said that they were persecuted as Afghans in Iran and maltreated and beaten up regularly, but the younger man (brother) said “We didn’t have enough money to eat!” Of course the social workers asked how they arranged for the trip, but at this point both men just said that: “After we decided to leave we started to look for the money and after a while the money was found, and then we hit the road to Turkey”….

Well…. I think a very appropriate question for these “authorities” to ask at this point would have been: “Hey, wait a second! You said you were such a poor family. How much exactly did you pay for this trip and where did you get the money?” But these two aunties were not the least bit interested in this very crucial piece of information!

They never asked for a followup question on that issue from neither of these men. They asked many many followup questions about how meanly Iranians had treated these illegal immigrant Afghans in Iran, but not a peep about where such poor men got the money to travel to Europe. So 2 members of a poor family come here paying thousands to the smugglers and nobody wants to know where the money came from!

I must say I have seen a pattern like this in all of the interviews were I was present. A general disinterest in the sources of money that they paid to the smugglers prevails. As if a “don’t ask-don’t tell” policy is tacitly in place. Even in my own conversations with the “refugees” I have never succeeded in making them tell exactly how they got the money.

They usually say that their relatives or father paid. But in the same breath they declare that they are really poor people and that’s why they are here. And some of them, being totally illiterate and uneducated couldn’t have been that well off apart from crime. So the sources that finance these migrants’ trips is a huge question mark for me. I smell a rat here.

In the end of the interview the older brother was asked how does he feel now that he is here in Finland. He said: “Well…. when I arrived I was very happy, but now I am not so happy anymore. Because we had been told that here, they take such good care of immigrants and pamper them so much, but no such thing materialised! I need new clothes and our guide promised to buy me new clothes but so far they only took us to a secondhand shop and they had nothing that suited me.

Also they constantly offer donated clothes. They are no good. I was told that here they offer you 300€ per year for clothes shopping. I want to get the money and go clothes shopping by myself from a normal shop! Besides I have tooth ache and they told me that I have to wait till the end of the month!! My tooth will totally rot by then! And my brother needs a dentist but they said we have to wait for a few months to see one. And the Nokia mobile phones that they gave us are too old and have no internet function and doesn’t work properly. So I think we have been somewhat cheated!”

Of course the aunties at this point explained helpfully that: “No,no, no… the picture that the smugglers give about our country is not correct. We ourselves have to wait for dentist appointment and we don’t have much money and the newest mobile phones, etc..” But they had no sense of outrage at the expectations of this guy and were humouring it very happily.

The younger brother answered to the same question by saying: “I miss home!” He was somewhat of a quiet guy and looked very depressed already.

By the way, in the end, the aunties summoned both men to their office and gave a helpful tip to them:

“Before your big interview with the authorities sit down with your brother and sisters and review your stories, coordinate everything, and make sure that you say the same story in the final interview, OK?”

In the very end when the boys left the room they both exclaimed: “Such handsome men. So nice! I hope they get to stay! They need safety!!”

NOTE: The workers in question were both social workers, which I assume means they had social worker’s training. I don’t know if they had any special training for their immigration interviews or not.

7 Responses

  1. People employed by the State, who are coaching people who have entered the couutry under fase pretences to lie – is purely and simply fraud. And there would be laws in the Finnish legal system against it.

    They need to be reported and lose their jobs. They are not helping Finland one iota.

    1. Where can one go and officially and annonymously complain about them? Do you know?

    2. Where can one go and officially and anonymously complain about them? Do you know?

  2. Maybe try //www.poliisi.fi/nettip ? But I expect there would be some method of whistleblowing to Finnish government authorities.

    “Reporting of illegal activities

    Finnish legislation does not contain any particular provision on the reporting of misconduct and corruption with regard to state civil servants.

    However, there is a general rule that an officeholder normally is responsible for reporting illegal activities observed. In the Local Officials Act, there is an obligation to report offences “in well substantiated” cases to the police without delay:

    Section 47 states:

    ”If an officeholder is suspected, on probable grounds, of being guilty of an offence in office or of otherwise acting contrary to his duties, he or she can be suspended from his or her duties for the period of an investigation or legal proceedings. Notification of violations in well-substantiated cases shall be made without delay.

    If an officeholder is suspected, on probable grounds, of being guilty of an offence outside office, he or she can be suspended from his or her duties for the period of an investigation or legal proceedings, if the facts emerging from the case might affect the officeholder’s ability to manage his or her duties.

    In cases other than those referred to in subsections 1 and 2, an officeholder may be suspended from his or her duties for the time that the officeholder, for reasons due to his or her person, is unable to perform the duties in an appropriate manner.”

    So obviously there are laws in place that can be applied to cases such as this.

    1. I agree, we need more people telling what’s going on and informing the police to act.

  3. OK – so to highlight it – the paragraph rcommends going to the Police to report contraventions in accordance to Section 47 :

    “In the Local Officials Act, there is an obligation to report offences “in well substantiated” cases to the police without delay:”

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