multiculturalism

JUST A THOUGHT ON MULTICULTURALISM IN LIGHT OF RECENT HAPPENINGS IN FINLAND (ANTI-IMMONEN DEMONIZATION)…….

It’s my opinion that the ideology of ”multiculturalism” is a product of an anti-enlightenment, post -modern ideological thinking, which in the end, (regardless of intentions) re-tribalizes (balkanization of) society, and therefore a de facto rejection of the nation state. Such an ideology can only exist and thrive within a society given over to statism, which is a rejection of the enlightenment, and of the individual and individual rights, for group rights and identity politics. That’s the dilemma for people pursuing so called ”equality” of outcome.

This is exactly what I’ve been saying about identity politics (a.k.a. ”group rights”), the state wittingly or unwittingly, carves up society (in the name of diversity) and pits these competing groups against each other for services.

The city council had hoped to draw minorities into the democratic process, but the groups struggled to define their individual and collective mandates. Some of them, such as the African and Caribbean People’s Movement, represented an ethnic group, whereas others, such as the Council of Black-Led Churches, were also religious. Diversity among the groups was matched by diversity within them; not all the people supposedly represented by the Bangladeshi Islamic Projects Consultative Committee, for example, were equally devout. Yet the city council’s plan effectively assigned every member of a minority to a discrete community, defined each group’s needs as a whole, and set the various organizations in competition with one another for city resources. And anyone who fell outside these defined communities was effectively excluded from the multicultural process altogether.

NOTE: This could not happen within a society that’s based solely upon safeguarding of the individual and on individual rights.

The failure of multiculturalism

[…]

The immigrants brought with them traditions and mores from their homelands, of which they were often very proud. But they were rarely preoccupied with preserving their cultural differences, nor did they generally consider culture to be a political issue. What troubled them was not a desire to be treated differently but the fact that they were treated differently. Racism and inequality, not religion and ethnicity, constituted their key concerns. In the following decades, a new generation of black and Asian activists, forming groups such as the Asian Youth Movements and the Race Today Collective, acted on those grievances, organizing strikes and protests challenging workplace discrimination, deportations, and police brutality. These efforts came to explosive climax in a series of riots that tore through the United Kingdom’s inner cities in the late 1970s and early 1980s.

At that point, British authorities recognized that unless minority communities were given a political stake in the system, tensions would continue to threaten urban stability. It was in this context that multicultural policies emerged. The state, at both the national and the local level, pioneered a new strategy of drawing black and Asian communities into the mainstream political process by designating specific organizations or community leaders to represent their interests. At its heart, the approach redefined the concepts of racism and equality. Racism now meant not simply the denial of equal rights but also the denial of the right to be different. And equality no longer entailed possessing rights that transcended race, ethnicity, culture, and faith; it meant asserting different rights because of them.

Consider the case of Birmingham, the United Kingdom’s second most populous city. In 1985, the city’s Handsworth area was engulfed by riots sparked by a simmering resentment of poverty, joblessness, and, in particular, police harassment. Two people died and dozens were injured in the violence. In the aftermath of the unrest, the city council attempted to engage minorities by creating nine so-called umbrella groups – organizations that were supposed to advocate for their members on matters of city policy. These committees decided on the needs of each community, how and to whom resources should be disbursed, and how political power should be distributed. They effectively became surrogate voices for ethnically defined fiefdoms.

The city council had hoped to draw minorities into the democratic process, but the groups struggled to define their individual and collective mandates. Some of them, such as the African and Caribbean People’s Movement, represented an ethnic group, whereas others, such as the Council of Black-Led Churches, were also religious. Diversity among the groups was matched by diversity within them; not all the people supposedly represented by the Bangladeshi Islamic Projects Consultative Committee, for example, were equally devout. Yet the city council’s plan effectively assigned every member of a minority to a discrete community, defined each group’s needs as a whole, and set the various organizations in competition with one another for city resources. And anyone who fell outside these defined communities was effectively excluded from the multicultural process altogether.

The problem with Birmingham’s policies, observed Joy Warmington, director of what was then the Birmingham Race Action Partnership (now brap), a charitable organization working to reduce inequality, in 2005, is that they ‘have tended to emphasize ethnicity as a key to entitlement. It’s become accepted as good practice to allocate resources on ethnic or faith lines. So rather than thinking of meeting people’s needs or about distributing resources equitably, organizations are forced to think about the distribution of ethnicity’ (personal interview for my book From Fatwa to Jihad). The consequences were catastrophic. In October 2005, two decades after the original Handsworth riots, violence broke out in the neighbouring area of Lozells. In 1985, Asian, black, and white demonstrators had taken to the streets together to protest poverty, unemployment, and police harassment. In 2005, the fighting was between blacks and Asians. The spark had been a rumour, never substantiated, that a group of Asian men had raped a Jamaican girl. The fighting lasted a full weekend.

handsworth songs

Why did two communities that had fought side by side in 1985 fight against each other in 2005? The answer lies largely in Birmingham’s multicultural policies. As one academic study of Birmingham’s policies observed, ‘The model of engagement through Umbrella Groups tended to result in competition between bme [black and minority ethnic] communities for resources. Rather than prioritizing needs and cross-community working, the different Umbrella Groups generally attempted to maximize their own interests.’

The council’s policies, in other words, not only bound people more closely to particular identities but also led them to fear and resent other groups as competitors for power and influence. An individual’s identity had to be affirmed as distinctive from the identities of those from other groups: being Bangladeshi in Birmingham also meant being not Irish, not Sikh, and not African Caribbean. The consequence was the creation of what the economist Amartya Sen has termed ‘plural monoculturalism’ – a policy driven by the myth that society is made up of distinct, uniform cultures that dance around one another. The result in Birmingham was to entrench divisions between black and Asian communities to such an extent that those divisions broke out into communal violence.

More here. H/T: Iivi

NOTE II: One point of criticism I have is the fact that, while I believe that the writer is being truthful about the Muslim dynamic in the piece, he doesn’t take into account outside Islamic movements/traditional islamic dynamic that drives greater separation and hegemony within european society. In other words, it’s a symbiotic relationship that’s well matched between the promoters of multicultural policies, and Islamic communities domestic and abroad.

One Response

  1. Excellent article – it should be published far and wide.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *