Anti-Semitism in the Netherlands Holocaust Holocaust Survivors Netherlands

DUTCH GOVERNMENT FINED JEWS FOR TAX EVASION FOR TIME SPENT IN HIDING AND IN NAZI DEATH CAMPS……..

 

Speechless.

I literally had to rub my eyes upon reading the headline forwarded to me, unbelievable. The Dutch government at the time had the gall to take salt and grind into the open wounds of these Jews who managed to survive the Holocaust against all odds, only to be victimized once more, financially and mentally as well.

NOTE: Read more about the Dutch restitution process for its role in the Holocaust.

FM: BadNewsFromTheNetherlands

dutch holocaust victims

Amsterdam Fined Concentration Camp Survivors after War

It has now become known, more than 65 years after the Second World War that the city of Amsterdam fined hundreds of Jewish Holocaust survivors for tax avoidance when they were in concentration camps or hiding from the Nazis. This was exposed by the daily Het Parool and has been picked up by the Washington Times. Numerous Jewish homes were then confiscated and occupied by Dutch Nazi members. Amsterdam continued with its tax policy even as other municipalities waived their debts.

DUTCH JEWS FINED FOR TAX EVASION FOR TIME SPENT IN NAZI DEATH CAMPS 3.4.2013

THE HAGUE (JTA) — The City of Amsterdam fined hundreds of Jewish Holocaust survivors for failing to pay taxes while they were in hiding or in concentration camps.

The affair was exposed in an article in Het Parool, a local daily, on March 30. Many of the houses in question were confiscated and used by members of the NSB Dutch Nazi party while the Jewish owners were in hiding or in camps.

The city went after survivors as late as 1947, the report said. Other Dutch municipalities waived such debts, Het Parool reported. The following year the city agreed to reimburse half of what it charged to some Jews who were taxed in absentia. The city’s archives contain 342 requests for reimbursement, Het Parool reported.

The documents about this taxation were discovered by Charlotte van den Berg, a 23-year-old university student. She said she found them bundled with an elastic band in the archive section of one of the city’s departments while conducting research on Jewish home owners.

A spokesperson for the city told the daily the city would investigate the matter, including how much money was collected from Holocaust survivors, together with the NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

More here.

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