Finland Immigration multiculturalism Refugees

GROWING LANGUAGE BARRIER IN FINNISH MATERNITY WARDS FRUSTRATES STAFF…….

WHEN FINNISH, SWEDISH AND ENGLISH
ARE MET WITH A BLANK STARE
Mitä? Vad? What?

This is just one of the many pitfalls mass-immigration and open armed refugee policies produce. The Euro friendly politicians and EU mandarins that now dictate EU member state immigration/refugee polices, didn’t think to ask or research the possibilities for such a circumstance. Check out the part where they openly admit about “the surge” in immigrant moms-to-be.  KGS

Language Barrier Isolates Immigrants in Maternity Ward

Helsinki’s Women’s Clinic sees three times more women of foreign backgrounds than it did just a decade ago.
Doctors in Finland are increasingly facing cultural and communication barriers when trying to treat patients. This is especially evident in women’s health centres such as the Helsinki Women’s Clinic, where many foreign women give birth.
Imagine going into labour and having no idea what your midwife is saying. This is a reality for some immigrant women giving birth in Finland.
“Unfortunately there are women who don’t share a common language with us, which means they don’t speak English and they don’t speak Swedish, and then it’s always much more difficult,” says Erja Halmesmäki, a senior consultant at the Helsinki Women’s Clinic.
Surge in Immigrant Moms-to-Be
Today Helsinki’s Women’s Clinic sees three times more women of foreign backgrounds than it did just a decade ago. Ten percent of the annual 5,500 births at the hospital are to immigrants. Most foreign women having babies at the Women’s Clinic have refugee backgrounds and mainly come from Somalia. Kurds from Iran and Iraq also make up a large group. The proportion of Russians is also increasing.
At Helsinki’s Women’s Clinic, language barriers far outweigh any cultural clashes. Halmesmäki says this is nowhere more evident than in cases of illiterate women who can’t benefit from any written material provided by the hospital.
“I think the most difficult cases are those of women who come from very different backgrounds and who don’t read and write,” says Halmesmäki, adding that finding suitable interpreters can also be a challenge.

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